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By Thomas Henry Huxley

Excerpt from proof as to Man's position in Nature

The larger a part of the substance of the next Essays has already been released within the type of Oral Discourses, addressed to generally diverse audiences, dur ing the previous 3 years.

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Neck short, thick, and hairy; chest and shoulders very broad, said to be fully double the size of the Enche-ekos; arms very long, reaching some way below the knee—the fore-arm much the shortest; hands very large, the thumbs much larger than the fingers The gait is shuffling; the motion of the body, which is 49 never upright as in man, but bent forward, is somewhat rolling, or from side to side. The arms being longer than the Chimpanzee, it d oes **V not stoop as much in walking; like that animal, it makes progression by thrusting its arms forward, resting the hands on the ground, and then giving the body a half jumping half swinging motion FIG.

Neck short, thick, and hairy; chest and shoulders very broad, said to be fully double the size of the Enche-ekos; arms very long, reaching some way below the knee—the fore-arm much the shortest; hands very large, the thumbs much larger than the fingers The gait is shuffling; the motion of the body, which is 49 never upright as in man, but bent forward, is somewhat rolling, or from side to side. The arms being longer than the Chimpanzee, it d oes **V not stoop as much in walking; like that animal, it makes progression by thrusting its arms forward, resting the hands on the ground, and then giving the body a half jumping half swinging motion FIG.

Vol. V. 1847. 22 the inspection of a specimen alive or dead/' The result of the combined exertions of Messrs. Savage and Wilson was not only the obtaining of a very full account of the habits of this new creature, but a still more important service to science, the enabling the excellent American anatomist already mentioned, Professor Wyman, to describe, from ample materials, the distinctive osteological characters of the new form. This animal was called by the natives of the Gaboon " Enge-ena," a name obviously identical with the "Ingena" of Bowdich; and Dr.

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